Opinions on interracial dating

26 May

In 2000, 24 percent of Blacks and 11 percent of Whites said they strongly favor their close relative marrying someone of the opposite race.In 2012, the gap remains at 42 percent for Blacks and 13 percent for Whites.The gap between the percentage of Americans who hold a favorable attitude toward Black-White marriage and the percent of actual Black-White marriages suggests that the general interracial marriage opinion questions used in many surveys are too broad for understanding how people actually feel about marrying outside one’s race.More specifically, early surveys usually asked people whether they approve or disapprove of marriage between Blacks and Whites.During that year, more educated Whites were significantly more in favor of Black-White marriage for their close relatives as compared to their less educated counterparts.Similarly, we found some important generational influences on attitudes toward Black-White marriage among Whites in 2000.

The result is lower for Whites, among whom only one-in-four (26 percent) said they were in favor of their close relative marrying a Black person. Supreme Court ruled in the 1960s that laws banning interracial sexual relations violate the Fourteenth Amendment to the U. Constitution, it was only in the last decade that anti-racial marriage laws were definitively struck down in all states, with Alabama being the last state to do so in 2000. This represents less than 1 percent of all marriages in the country. In our research, we went beyond general opinion questions and used recent General Social Survey data sets that included questions on how black and white Americans actually feel about their close relative marrying outside their own race.Such findings show that interracial relations are still unfavorable in the United States. Nonetheless, the number of Black-White marriages remains relatively low, at 558,000 according to the 2010 U. So what factors explain these patterns of Black-White marriages in the U. Both racial specific conditions and individual characteristics are at play.First, in terms of race, Whites are still less likely to support interracial marriage as compared to Blacks.In this light, our work offers a more comprehensive picture of racial relations in the U. 30 article in Fifteen Minutes about interracial dating on Harvard's campus, "With or Without Discrimination, Subverting Stereotypes Through Dating," presents the opinions of our experiences as a black-white couple as a series of critiques solely coming from the Harvard black community; in fact, our experiences with black students are only a part of our experiences here at Harvard and this article has falsely presented the black community as a monolithic entity with one negative voice regarding interracial relationships.